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Wall Drawing #493, The wall is divided vertically into three equal parts. All one-, two-, and three-part combinations of three colors

Sol LeWitt (American, 1928–2007)

1986

Medium Lascaux acrylic wash Measurements H: 174 x W: 631 in. (442 x 1602.7 cm) Credit Gift of the artist Accession Number 86.39 Location Museum of Art Lobby

Narrative

Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.

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Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative; LeWitt, Sol; Wall Drawing #493, 1986, 86.39; Wall Drawing #450, 1985, 85.59
Two distinct but related wall drawings by Sol LeWitt span the wall of the stairs leading from the museum's lobby to the main exhibition galleries. Wall Drawing #450 was commissioned for the 1985 Carnegie International. In 1986, LeWitt saw the completed work and decided to extend it with the complementary Wall Drawing #493. Working under instructions provided by the artist, several individuals created these drawings by applying washes of India ink to a primed wall surface. Over time, the ink faded as a result of exposure to sunlight; in 2007 the drawings were restored to their original color and luminosity using more stable acrylic paints. Asserting that the “idea becomes the machine that makes the art,” LeWitt was a critical figure in the shift to Conceptual art in the late 1960s. This notion, which refutes the traditional conception of the artist as exclusive author or creative genius, is underscored in LeWitt’s drawings conceived after 1970. These exist initially only as a certified set of written instructions, which are adapted to a given space by the individuals who carry out the directions (in the case of these drawings, dividing the wall “vertically into four equal parts,” and so on). Because they conform to their particular surroundings, and reflect the decisions and handiwork of the people who execute them, the works of art are different each time they are installed. Initially LeWitt participated in the execution of his drawings, but later works have all been carried out by others who meticulously follow his directives. The 2007 restoration was completed by Sarah Heinemann with Chantal Bernicky, Matthew Cummings, Cara Erskine, Robin Hewlett, Lilith Bailey Kroll, Dale Luce, Julia McAfee, Sandra Streiff, and Stephen Stribling.
Date: 2015
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Reilly, Katie - CMOA