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Heart Pavilion

Dan Graham (American, b. 1942)

1991

Medium two-way mirror glass, aluminum Measurements H: 94 x W: 168 x D: 144 in. (238.8 x 426.7 x 365.8 cm) Credit A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund and Carnegie International Acquisition Fund Accession Number 92.5 Location Not on View

Narrative

Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.

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Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative

Title: Web Object Narrative, Scaife, 92.5; Graham, Dan; Heart Pavilion, 1991
Created for the 1991 Carnegie International, Dan Graham’s Heart Pavilion produces a complex triangulation of viewer, object, and context. Approaching the structure from the outside, visitors encounter themselves and their surroundings reflected in the mirrored surface; upon entering the pavilion, they assume a secreted position behind the two-way glass, and look out on other viewers regarding their own reflections. In this way, Heart Pavilion amplifies feelings of exposure and concealment in turn, highlighting looking itself as a meaningful, relational act and troubling the distinction between subject and object. The work reflects Graham’s interest in the social and psychological implications of the built environment; using materials associated with Modernist architecture, he constructs a space that encapsulates the urban experience of transparency and reflection, surveillance and self-consciousness. The shape of the pavilion—the simplified heart symbol popularly associated with love—adds a wry, even sentimental tone to the work, and playfully contrasts with the high seriousness of its Modernist references and setting.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative