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Roofs, Washington Square

Edward Hopper (American, 1882–1967)

1926

Medium watercolor over charcoal on paper Measurements H: 22 1/8 x W: 28 1/8 x D: 1 3/8 in. (56.2 x 71.44 x 3.49 cm) Credit Bequest of Mr. and Mrs. James H. Beal Accession Number 93.189.36 Location Gallery One

Narrative

Although he was always hostile to the development of abstract painting, Edward Hopper's art gives forth a distinctly modern feeling. In 1967, shortly after Hopper's death, James Thrall Soby commented that many of his (Soby's) friends among the Abstract Expressionist painters genuinely admired Hopper's work. "It always astonished me," Soby noted, "that these young artists exempted the late Edward Hopper from their acrimony against the realist tradition." In fact, the mood of loneliness and alienation in Hopper's paintings harmonizes well with the existentialist philosophies of this century, while his compositions always went beyond mere realistic transcription to establish patterns and relationships of abstract form. Hopper achieved success in watercolor at a time when his oil paintings were still being rejected from exhibitions. He took up the medium in 1923, not having used it seriously since his student days, except in his commercial work, and made a large group of watercolors of old buildings and lighthouses in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and in Portland and Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Late in 1923 The Brooklyn Museum purchased his House with Mansard Roof, the first painting he had sold since the Armory Show. In the following year he was taken up by the New York dealer Frank Rehn, who sold every watercolor on the wall, and five more as well, from the first show he put on of Hopper's work. In the fall of 1925 and spring of 1926, Edward Hopper painted a few watercolors of New York City. Among these were views from his rooftop that offered a dissected view of buildings with a bridge or road in the foreground. Most often, it is impossible to identify the building, as the juxtaposition of architecture and infrastructure was of interest to Hopper, rather than the exact location. Here, Hopper could not have chosen a more inauspicious subject-a view of the smokestacks on the roof of 3 Washington Square North, the building where his New York studio was located. The vertical rhythm of the chimneys and the bright mid-day sun gave the artist an opportunity to paint both light and color. His color choices are unusual—deep blue, pink, and rust-red—hardly the colors of an industrial gray New York rooftop!

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Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Label, CMOA Collects Hopper, 93.189.36; Hopper, Edward; Roofs, Washington Square, 1926
Hopper painted most of his watercolors on his summer travels. But between fall 1925 and spring 1926, he made a number of views from the rooftop of his studio at 3 Washington Square North in New York City. Ignoring the modern skyscrapers being erected nearby, Hopper renders the dense arrangement of chimneys and angled skylights in a formative study of light and shadow. Row after row, they echo the urban chaos at street level.
Purpose: label
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Title: Exhibition Text, CMOA Collects Hopper, Watercolors and the Triumph of Painting
WATERCOLORS AND TH TRIUMPH OF PAINTING With his reputation as an etcher on the rise, Hopper spent the summer of 1923 in Gloucester, Massachusetts, primarily painting in watercolor—­ a medium he used in Paris and for his commercial work. Gloucester, with its abundance of picturesque seaside landscapes and architecture, had long been a summer destination for artists living in New York. Watercolor gave Hopper the freedom to paint wherever he found a worthy subject. He would wander for days until satisfied with the ideal vantage point and time of day to capture striking effects of light and shadow on buildings, boats, and landscapes. That year Hopper made the acquaintance of Josephine (Jo) Nivison and the two spent the summer painting together. After returning to New York, Jo was asked by curators from the Brooklyn Museum of Art to participate in a group exhibition of drawings and water­colors, and she encouraged them to include works by Hopper. It was the break he needed. Critics raved, comparing Hopper's watercolors to those by the great American painter Winslow Homer. Brooklyn purchased The Mansard Roof, his first painting to sell since 1913. In 1924, Hopper and Jo married, and he held a solo exhibition of water­colors at Frank K. M. Rehn's gallery in New York. The exhibition was a monumental success, and Hopper sold all 11 watercolors and an addi­tional five kept in reserve. With high hopes for an even brighter future, he soon abandoned etching and his commercial work to focus on painting. The Hopper watercolors in the museum's collection were generously given by James and Rebecca Beal. The Beals amassed— in their modest Craig Street apartment— a remarkable collection of American modernism that they donated over several decades.
Date: 2015
Purpose: exhibition tet
Author: May, Akemi - CMOA

Artist Bio

Although he was always hostile to the development of abstract painting, Edward Hopper's art gives forth a distinctly modern feeling. In 1967, shortly after Hopper's death, James Thrall Soby commented that many of his (Soby's) friends among the Abstract Expressionist painters genuinely admired Hopper's work. "It always astonished me," Soby noted, "that these young artists exempted the late Edward Hopper from their acrimony against the realist tradition." In fact, the mood of loneliness and alienation in Hopper's paintings harmonizes well with the existentialist philosophies of this century, while his compositions always went beyond mere realistic transcription to establish patterns and relationships of abstract form.

Hopper achieved success in watercolor at a time when his oil paintings were still being rejected from exhibitions. He took up the medium in 1923, not having used it seriously since his student days, except in his commercial work, and made a large group of watercolors of old buildings and lighthouses in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and in Portland and Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Late in 1923 The Brooklyn Museum purchased his House with Mansard Roof, the first painting he had sold since the Armory Show. In the following year he was taken up by the New York dealer Frank Rehn, who sold every watercolor on the wall, and five more as well, from the first show he put on of Hopper's work.