Search the Collection

Armchair

Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867–1959)

Blue Stem Foundry (American, active c. 1955–c. 1985)

1956

Medium cast aluminum with modern upholstery Measurements H: 35 1/2 x W: 27 x D: 27 in. (90.17 x 68.6 x 68.6 cm) Credit Women's Committee Acquisition Fund Accession Number 2005.18 Location Not on View

Narrative

This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.

Show More

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label

Title: Label, Scaife; 2005.18; Wright, Frank Lloyd (designer), Blue Stem Foundry (manufacturer); Armchair, 1956
This cast-aluminum upholstered chair was one of the last iconic objects designed by Frank Lloyd Wright during his nearly 70-year career. Wright created the chair for the H. C. Price Company Tower, built in 1956 in the prairie town of Bartlesville, Oklahoma. The floor plan of the building is based on 30-, 60-, and 90-degree triangles laid edge to edge to form equilateral triangles, parallelograms, trapezoids, and hexagons. The furniture, much of which was built into its architectural surroundings, reflects the overarching geometry of the design. In this stenographer's chair--one of an original set of 14--faceted trapezoids and triangles create a polygonal base pierced with two trapezoidal cutouts. The seat and backrest are twin hexagons. Wright's innovative furniture was not always practical; some of these unwieldy chairs were removed from the Price building soon after it opened. This example previously belonged to Carolyn Price, who was the daughter-in-law of the company owner.
Purpose: label