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Woman and Child at a Window

Clarence H. White (American, 1871–1925)

1916

Medium platinum print Measurements H: 9 3/8 x W: 6 1/4 in. (23.81 x 15.88 cm) Credit Second Century Acquisition Fund Accession Number 2005.50.1.1 Location Not on View

Narrative

While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.

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Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda

Title: Label, Scaife, 2005.50.1.1, White, Clarence H., Woman and Child at a Window, 1916
While working full time as a bookkeeper in Newark, Ohio, Clarence White took up photography in 1893. Primarily self-taught, he received many awards for his submissions to regional photography competitions and exhibitions, including the 1898 Pittsburgh Salon at Carnegie Institute. White moved to New York in 1906, and in 1914, he opened his own school of photography, which eventually boasted legendary photographers such as Dorothea Lange and Margaret Bourke-White as alumni. This warm-toned platinum photograph shows a mother casually embracing her child, yet nothing about the image is accidental. White imbued the scene with symbolic significance: as the mother looks out of the softly illuminated window, the young girl looks back at her, suggesting that children gain perspective on the world through the eyes of their parents. The gestures of their arms and hands form a circular rhythm, speaking to the romanticism of the Pictorialists and their sensitivity to the way nature rejuvenates itself.
Date: 2012
Purpose: label
Author: Benedict-Jones, Linda