Search the Collection

Narrative

Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky

Show More

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Scaife; 2002.37; Harrison, Rachel; Utopia, 2002
Rachel Harrison's sculptures, combining organicalled derived and geometric abstract forms with found objects, photographs, or video, address her interest in the transition from perception to knowledge, experience to belief. She sets up mysteries, encouraging the viewer to look actively and to follower her allusive clues. An ambiguous conflation of craggy landscape and human figure, Utopia is one such visual puzzle. The work is reminiscent of Casper David Friedrich's Wanderer above a Sea of Mist of c. 1818, an icon of German Romantic painting in which the protagonist--seen from the back--confronts the majesty and force of nature. Taken from one angle, hands on hips, Harrison's gilded little figurine appears triumphant as he stands on a ledge of a great mountain. Seen from a different vantage point, however, the mountain resembles a shrouded figure holding the man in its hands, suggesting he is in fact powerless and deluded in his self-assurance. A chunk of pyrite, also known as "fool's gold," resting on a lower outcropping reinforces the idea that not everything is as it appears, and that our sense of personal control and understanding--derived from fallible sense perceptions--is illusory. The tiles of the piece, which refers to the notion of an ideal society, also has a double meaning: taken from Greek, "utopia" can be interpreted to mean both "good place" and "no place." AUDIO 337 Director's Choice: Hear directly from Carnegie Museum of Art director Lynn Zelevansky
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Multimedia