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How High the Moon

Shiro Kuramata (Japanese, 1934–1991)

Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (Japanese, active 20th century–unknown)

Vitra AG (Swiss, b. 1934–present)

1986 (manufactured 2000)

Medium nickel-plated expanded steel mesh Measurements H: 28 1/2 x W: 38 x D: 32 in. (72.39 x 96.5 x 81.3 cm) Credit Richard L. Simmons Acquisition Fund Accession Number 2007.43 Location Not on View

Narrative

Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.

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Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA

Title: Label, Bruce, 2007.43; Kuramata, Shiro (designer), Terada Tekkojo, Ltd. (manufacturer); How High the Moon, 1986 (manufactured 2000)
Shiro Kuramata was known for his innovative use of new and non-traditional materials in furniture design, like the steel mesh seen here in How High the Moon. The name recalls a Duke Ellington tune yet playfully references the crescent shape of the back of the chair. Within the block of transparent steel mesh—hovering on nearly invisible feet—a smaller chair seems to float within a “rising moonscape.” Kuramata used industrial materials to create an object that is at once a minimalist sculpture and a shimmering apparition.
Date: 2015
Purpose: label
Author: Delphia, Ms. Rachel E. - CMOA