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I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre

Karen Kilimnik (American, b. 1955)

1991

Medium shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, Styrofoam, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins, acrylic paint, and sound Measurements H: Variable x W: Variable x D: Variable in. (0 x 0 x 0 cm) Credit A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund Accession Number 2010.2 Location Not on View

Narrative

Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.

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Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, 2010.2; Kilimnik, Karen; I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991
Young artists coming of age in the early 1990s, including Karen Kilimnik, found inspiration from an earlier generation of artists whose work comprised the Whitney Museum of American Art's 1990 exhibition and catalog, The New Sculpture 1965–75, organized by Richard Armstrong and Richard Marshal. Working in the grammar of post-minimalism in the late 1960s and early 70s, these artists manipulated raw materials by dropping, stretching, casting, burning, blurring, pulling, scattering, biting, hanging, piling, bunching, reflecting, tangling, and holding. The resulting sculptures conjure the human figure through the marks and impressions left by the artist's bodily interactions with the material, or through generalized or fragmentary figuration. Karen Kilimnik, along with artists of her generation such as Cady Noland, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, and Mike Kelley, used similar material actions to explore the subjects of pop culture, cable news cycles, and quotidian materials. Banal, degraded, abject, or seemingly inconsequential, the objects of Karen Kilimnik's installations together create jarring associations and hybrid perspectives on the issues of her day. In I Don't Like Mondays, the Boomtown Rats, Shooting Spree, or Schoolyard Massacre, 1991, Kilimnick hung, drilled, and painted some components onto the wall, and scattered others, standing and sitting on the floor. These components--including shooting targets, chicken wire, a cassette player and cassette, clothing, photocopies, a whiffle ball and bat, a badminton racket, baton, mechanical toy dog, toy guns, lunchbox, jump rope, rubber ball, pencils, notebooks, gravel, pushpins--together comprise an aggressive, unsettling scene that presents by turns as a shooting range, magazine spread, classroom, child's bedroom, and crime scene. Ingrid Schaffner, in her extended essay for Kilimnick's mid-career retrospective, describes the background of this work: "On January 28, 1979, sixteen-year-old Brenda Spencer opened fire on a Cleveland elementary school. She killed the principal and janitor and injured several children in a siege that lasted six hours. When asked why, Spencer responded coolly, "I don't like Mondays." Almost immediately the words became the title of a hit single by the Irish punk band The Boomtown Rats. The song plays on the portable stereo as the soundtrack to this installation. … When she made this work in 1991, Spencer's crime and the Boomtown Rat's song, both ten years in the past, were back in the public imagination since a boy in Texas had blown off his head at school and there was a song about it called "Jeremy" by Pearl Jam on the air." References to history, recent or remote, function in Kilimnick's work to reanimate contemporary circumstances and characters, connecting them to their predecessors through shared underlying cultural manias and themes. By proposing violence as a subject for formal, conceptual contemplation, Kilimnik takes a page from Andy Warhol and others who confront us with seemingly artificial or deadpan depictions of troubling subject matter. Questioning our roles as complicit consumers of schizophrenic culture, this work challenges us to consider how we process the baffling world around us. The work's fragments--arranged with willful artifice, the appearance of nonchalance, and even humor--work together to trigger our innate desire to form narratives and make associations with the stories, news, celebrities, memories, and people we know. The seeming randomness of scattered jacks, wire, stuffed animals, and tacky paint/blood, at first blush appearing maddeningly insincere, gives way to an intimation of the control, calculation and clear-eyed knowingness behind the work. The total effect is as scary and complicated as the cultural and aesthetic conditions themselves that make the work possible.
Date: 2010
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Artist Bio

Born in Philadelphia and educated at Temple University, Karen Kilimnik emerged in the early 1990s as a key proponent of so-called "scatter" art, alongside artists such as Felix Gonzales-Torres, Mike Kelley, Cady Noland, and Jack Pierson. Controversial for her seemingly casual, even aggressive, organization of materials and the unapologetically feminine perspective with which she animates her installations, Kilimnik seemed to have appeared "out of nowhere," and was the subject of many journalistic profiles and fervent critiques in the early years of her career.

From the deconstructed aesthetic of these earlier scatter pieces, comprised chiefly of pop culture detritus and co-opted imagery, Kilimnik has more recently developed a primarily painting-based practice, often outfitting intimate "antechambers" with diminutive, loosely-rendered canvases and props to create provocative mises-en-scènes. Like her early work, these evince an abundant, quasi-fictive world where lofty art historical references commingle with current events and cultural icons, ballet and romantic painting collide with punk music and celebrity glam, and classical taste joins with sly wit and darkly humorous metaphor.

Kilimnik's work has been the focus of several solo exhibitions in recent years, including shows at Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, MOCA Miami, Serpentine Gallery, London, Musée d'Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, Historisches Museum, Basel, Galerie Sprüth/Magers, Munich, and the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin, among other international venues. She participated in the 1993 Whitney Biennial, and has had her work selected for group exhibitions at Palais de Tokyo, Paris, P.S.1 and the Museum of Modern Art, Institute of Contemporary Art, London, Kunsthalle Dusseldorf, and Museum van Loon, Amsterdam, among many other museums and galleries worldwide.