Search the Collection

Song

Ragnar Kjartansson (Icelandic, b. 1976)

2011

Medium video; color, sound, 366 min. Measurements No Measurements Credit A. W. Mellon Acquisition Endowment Fund Accession Number 2012.10 Location Not on View

Narrative

Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.

Show More

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Label, Hall of Sculpture; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Song (2011) documents a performance held in Carnegie Museum of Art’s Hall of Sculpture from March 10 through March 27, 2011, as part of an exhibition devoted to the work of Ragnar Kjartansson. Kjartansson’s three nieces— Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—continuously performed during the museum’s open hours a gentle folk song written by Kjartansson. This video, filmed in a single six-hour take, is both a document of the performance and an artwork in its own right. The slowly circling camera adds to the hypnotism and eerie repetition of the singers’ actions. Kjartansson devised the song based on the misremembered words of Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He decided to incorporate it into a performance after he saw a picture of the Hall of Sculpture, where he could envision his nieces enacting this delicate hymn to love. As the natural light in the space shifts with the passage of day into night, the video registers the fleeting nature of experience, juxtaposed with a sense of timelessness derived from the classical architecture of the hall and the Siren-like performers. As you watch, the spotlight on the balcony transforms into a moon, and the artifice of production gives way to a hypnotic paean to beauty and love.
Date: 2013
Purpose: label
Author: Lippincott, Lulu - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA

Title: Web Object Narrative, Ragnar Kjartansson: Song; 2012.10; Kjartansson, Ragnar; Song, 2011
Performance by Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir Courtesy of the artist, Luhring Augustine, New York, and i8, Reykjavik From March 10 through March 27, 2011, Ragnar Kjartansson’s three nieces—Ragnheidur Harpa Leifsdóttir, Rakel Mjöll Leifsdóttir, and Íris María Leifsdóttir—sang a gentle folk song, written by Kjartansson, in the Hall of Sculpture. They sang continuously during the museum’s open hours, repeating a chorus based on Allen Ginsberg’s poem Song. He recalled the circumstances of writing the song: I was strumming my guitar in a hammock in a hippie commune in Nikiasalka, Poland. It was an old mansion, surrounded by forest and endless Polish fields. Children running around naked and artists building sculptures in trees and letting balloons go into thin air. Insect nights and sausages on fire. There was always somebody strumming a guitar. It was hot and there was no toilet. I dressed up in a white cocktail jacket and lay in a hammock reading Hemingway. One day I got bored with the serious people of the Spanish Civil War and managed to borrow the constantly strumming guitar. As I lay in the hammock I tried to remember that poem Song by Allen Ginsberg and strummed E major and A major. “The Weight of The World is Love.” Then I remembered something of sleep and dreams. Strumming, falling asleep, strumming, falling asleep. Kjartansson was interested in the perceived softness and femininity of the Hall of Sculpture performance. He created a tableau vivant, with the women on a platform that was somewhere between a stage and a bed. (Kjartansson referenced John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s famous “bed-ins.”) The repeated lyrics and chords of the performance kept the experience always stalled in the present, against the timelessness of antiquity expressed in the marble and plaster casts around them.
Date: 2011
Purpose: web object narrative
Author: Byers, Dan - CMOA