Art History Classes

Engage with Carnegie Museum of Art's collection and exhibitions

adult art history classes_658x292Engage with Carnegie Museum of Art's collection and exhibitions through the museum's art history classes. Programmed by the museum's education department, these classes offer terrific opportunities to investigate individual works or periods in greater depth, and allow visitors to connect with the art currently on view in our galleries.

Upcoming Classes

Ideas and Icons of American Industrial Design, 1925-1975
Wednesdays, February 10–March 2, 2016 (4 sessions)
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The major exhibition Silver to Steel: the Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk (through April 2016) follows the life and career of one of America's top industrial designers, who spent three incredible decades in Pittsburgh. Using Muller-Munk's story as a departure point, this class will explore the rise and evolution of industrial design as a distinctly American profession that married art, engineering, and social science.

About the Instructor

Rachel Delphia is the Alan G. and Jane A. Lehman Curator of Decorative Arts and Design at Carnegie Museum of Art. She is co-curator with Jewel Stern of Silver to Steel: the Modern Designs of Peter Muller-Munk. She studied industrial design at Carnegie Mellon University and has taught university courses in design history and exhibition design.

From Ritual Vessels to Ink Painting: A Thematic Introduction to Chinese Art
Wednesdays, March 5–26, 2016 (4 sessions)
Saturdays, March 9–30, 2016 (4 sessions)
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A ritual bronze vessel, a brick from a tomb wall, a ceramic horse, a head of a bodhisattva – these Chinese art objects in the collection of CMOA reveal much about the historical, social, and religious contexts in which they were created. In this course, we will delve into key periods of Chinese art history, using objects from the collection as a starting point. Focused discussions each week include ritual objects in Bronze Age China, grave goods and the afterlife in the Qin and Han Dynasties, Tang and Song depictions of the urban and natural environment, and the role of luxury objects and painting in creating a sophisticated court culture in the Yuan and Ming dynasties.

About the Instructor

Rachel Miller's research focuses on Italian Renaissance and Baroque art with an emphasis on the artistic patronage of the Jesuits, including the art and architecture produced on their overseas missions. Miller also has a strong interest in medieval and early modern Japanese art and the exchange of artistic methods and material culture between Europe and Japan in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Her MA paper examined the art and architecture produced by the Jesuits on their missions in Japan from 1549 to 1614. Miller's doctoral thesis is titled Apostle to the Indies: The Global Iconography and Dissemination of Images of St. Francis Xavier. This project examines images of this missionary saint produced both in Europe and on key Jesuit missions, such as in Goa, and aims to provide a new understanding of the global nature of Jesuit hagiography and iconography.

Importations and Adaptations: The Visual Traditions of Japan from Ancient to Modern
Saturdays, April 2–23, 2016 (4 sessions)
Wednesdays, April 6–27, 2016 (4 sessions)
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The history of Japanese art can be defined as a constant interplay between indigenous and imported art forms. In this course, we will examine these two poles of Japanese art from the prehistoric period to the twentieth century. Our discussions will be dedicated to examining how Japanese artists accepted foreign artistic elements, adapted them and mixed them with indigenous elements to create uniquely Japanese visual traditions. The first three weeks of the course will be devoted to a chronological survey of the art and architecture of Japan up to the Edo period, while the last will focus specifically on the Edo-period and modern Japanese prints that can be found in CMOA’s collection.

About the Instructor

Rachel Miller's research focuses on Italian Renaissance and Baroque art with an emphasis on the artistic patronage of the Jesuits, including the art and architecture produced on their overseas missions. Miller also has a strong interest in medieval and early modern Japanese art and the exchange of artistic methods and material culture between Europe and Japan in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Her MA paper examined the art and architecture produced by the Jesuits on their missions in Japan from 1549 to 1614. Miller's doctoral thesis is titled Apostle to the Indies: The Global Iconography and Dissemination of Images of St. Francis Xavier. This project examines images of this missionary saint produced both in Europe and on key Jesuit missions, such as in Goa, and aims to provide a new understanding of the global nature of Jesuit hagiography and iconography.

Registration Information

Register online using the links above. Call 412.622.3288 to register by phone. Scholarships for art history classes are available. To apply for a scholarship please contact us at adults@cmoa.org.